Urban Soccer Symposium

The U.S. Soccer Foundation will host the 2021 Urban Soccer Symposium virtually on March 25 and 26.

Please continue to check back for more information!

The Urban Soccer Symposium gathers community leaders and speakers from across the nation who are dedicated to improving the field of sports-based youth development. The Symposium features two days of interactive workshops and inspiring keynote presentations focused on sharing best practices and maximizing organizations’ impact in their respective communities.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

We are seeking engaging, high-quality workshop facilitators who will spark conversation, inspire attendees, and generate innovate ideas around soccer development, cultures of health, youth development, community engagement, safe spaces, and organizational capacity. 

For more details or to submit your workshop speaker proposal, check out the RFP

This application is open to a variety of presenters, not strictly soccer programmers. Special considerations will be given toward presentations that speak to promising practices that have been developed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

For questions, please email Tori Ramataboee at tramataboee@ussoccerfoundation.org.

 

TAKE A LOOK BACK AT THE 2019 URBAN SOCCER SYMPOSIUM

Soccer symposium speakers
The 2019 Urban Soccer Symposium, presented by Soccer Shots, took place March 15-17, 2019 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C. The event attracted 287 participants representing 183 unique organizations from 31 states. For more details, read the event recap on our blog.
Schedule

In 2019, there were over 75 presenters with workshop topics ranging from trauma-informed sports programming, developing partnerships and collaboration to increase organizational capacity, and tailoring program delivery to varying needs and abilities, among many others.

2019 Capitol Hill Day

In 40 different meetings, Capitol Hill Day participants shared the impact their organizations have in members’ districts and discussed federal funding requests. These discussions included requests for support for the Youth Mentoring Program (funded by OJJDP), the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program, AmeriCorps, and SNAP-Ed.